A Macroblock Optimization for Grid-Based Nonlinear Elasticity

Nathan Mitchell, Michael Doescher, Eftychios Sifakis

We introduce a new numerical approach for the solution of grid-based discretizations of nonlinear elastic models. Our method targets the linearized system of equations within each iteration of the Newton method, and combines elements of a direct factorization scheme with an iterative Conjugate Gradient method. The goal of our hybrid scheme is to inherit as many of the advantages of its constituent approaches, while curtailing several of their respective drawbacks. In particular, our algorithm converges in far fewer iterations than Conjugate Gradients, especially for systems with less-than-ideal conditioning. On the other hand, our approach largely avoids the storage footprint and memory-bound nature of direct methods, such as sparse Cholesky factorization, while offering very direct opportunities for both SIMD and thread-based parallelism. Conceptually, our method aggregates a rectangular neighborhood of grid cells (typically a 16x8x8 subgrid) into a composite element that we refer to as a “macroblock”. Similar to conventional tetrahedral or hexahedral elements, macroblocks receive nodal inputs (e.g., displacements) and compute nodal outputs (e.g., forces). However, this input/output interface now only includes nodes on the boundary of the 16x8x8 macroblock; interior nodes are always solved exactly, by means of a direct, highly optimized solver. Models built from macroblocks are solved using Conjugate Gradients, which is accelerated due to the reduced number of degrees of freedom and improved robustness against poor conditioning thanks to the direct solver within each macroblock. We explain how we attain these benefits with just a small increase of the per-iteration cost over the simplest traditional solvers.

A Macroblock Optimization for Grid-Based Nonlinear Elasticity

Constrained Neighbor Lists for SPH-based Fluid Simulations

Rene Winchenbach, Hendrik Hochstetter, Andreas Kolb

In this paper we present a new approach to create neighbor lists with strict memory bounds for incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. Our proposed approach is based on a novel efficient predictive-corrective algorithm that locally adjusts particle support radii in order to yield neighborhoods of a user-defined maximum size. Due to the improved estimation of the initial support radius, our algorithm is able to efficiently calculate neighborhoods in a single iteration in almost any situation. We compare our neighbor list algorithm to previous approaches and show that our proposed approach can handle larger particle numbers on a single GPU due to its strict guarantees and is able to simulate more particles in real time due to its benefits in regard to performance. Additionally we demonstrate the versatility and stability of our approach in several different scenarios, for example multi-scale simulations and with different kernel functions.

Constrained Neighbor Lists for SPH-based Fluid Simulations

Topology-Aware Neighborhoods for Point-Based Simulation and Reconstruction

Florian Canezin, Gael Guennebaud, Loïc Barthe

Particle based simulations are widely used in computer graphics. In this field, several recent results have improved the simulation itself or improved the tension of the final fluid surface. In current particle based implementations, the particle neighborhood is computed by considering the Euclidean distance between fluid particles only. Thus particles from different fluid components interact, which generates both local incorrect behavior in the simulation and blending artifacts in the reconstructed fluid surface. Our method introduces a better neighborhood computation for both the physical simulation and surface reconstruction steps. We track and store the local fluid topology around each particle using a graph structure. In this graph, only particles within the same local fluid component are neighbors and other disconnected fluid particles are inserted only if they come into contact. The graph connectivity also takes into account the asymmetric behavior of particles when they merge and split, and the fluid surface is reconstructed accordingly, thus avoiding their blending at distance before a merge. In the simulation, this neighborhood information is exploited for better controlling the fluid density and the force interactions at the vicinity of its boundaries. For instance, it prevents the introduction of collision events when two distinct fluid components are crossing without contact, and it avoids fluid interactions through thin waterproof walls. This leads to an overall more consistent fluid simulation and reconstruction.

Topology-Aware Neighborhoods for Point-Based Simulation and Reconstruction

Compressing Fluid Subspaces

Aaron Demby Jones, Pradeep Sen, Theodore Kim

Subspace fluid simulations, also known as reduced-order simulations, can be extremely fast, but also require basis matrices that consume an enormous amount of memory. Motivated by the extreme sparsity of Laplacian eigenfunctions in the frequency domain, we design a frequency-space codec that is capable of compressing basis matrices by up to an order of magnitude. However, if computed naively, decompression can be highly inefficient and dominate the running time, effectively negating the advantage of the subspace approach. We show how to significantly accelerate the decompressor by performing the key matrix-vector product in the sparse frequency domain. Subsequently, our codec only adds a factor of three or four to the overall runtime. The compression preserves the overall quality of the simulation, which we show in a variety of examples.

Compressing Fluid Subspaces

Asynchronous Implicit Backward Euler Integration

Danyong Zhao, Yijing Li, Jernej Barbic

In standard deformable object simulation in computer animation, all the mesh elements or vertices are timestepped synchronously, i.e., under the same timestep. Previous asynchronous methods have been largely limited to explicit integration. We demonstrate how to perform spatially-varying timesteps for the widely popular implicit backward Euler integrator. Spatially-varying timesteps are useful when the object exhibits spatially-varying material properties such as Young’s modulus or mass density. In synchronous simulation, a region with a high stiffness (or low mass density) will force a small timestep for the entire mesh, at a great computational cost, or else, the motion in the stiff (or low mass density) region will be artificially damped and inaccurate. Our method can assign smaller timesteps to stiffer (or lighter) regions, which makes it possible to properly resolve (sample) the high-frequency deformable dynamics arising from the stiff (or light) materials, resulting in greater accuracy and less artificial damping. Because soft (or heavy) regions can continue using a large timestep, our method provides a significantly higher accuracy under a fixed computational budget.

Asynchronous Implicit Backward Euler Integration

Real-time Simulation of Large Elasto-Plastic Deformation with Shape Matching

Nuttapong Chentanez, Matthias Müller, Miles Macklin

Shape matching is a popular method for simulating deformable objects in real time as it is fast and stable at large time steps. Although shape matching can simulate large elastic deformation and ductile fracturing, until now, they are limited to scenarios with relatively small plastic deformation. In this work, we present a method for simulating deformable solids undergoing large plastic deformation and topological changes using shape matching within the position based dynamics (PBD) framework. This expands the versatility of PBD which was previously shown to be able to simulate rigid bodies, liquids, gases, cloth, and deformable solids with moderate plastic deformation. Our novel contributions include local particle re-sampling, cluster re-sampling and skinning of an explicitly tracked surface mesh.

Real-time Simulation of Large Elasto-Plastic Deformation with Shape Matching

Enriching SPH Simulation by Approximate Capillary Waves

Sheng Yang Xiaowei He Huamin Wang Sheng Li Guoping Wang Enhua Wu Kun Zhou

Capillary waves are difficult to simulate due to their fast traveling speed and high frequency. In this paper, we propose to approximate capillary wave effects by surface compression waves under the SPH framework. To achieve this goal, we present a method to convert surface tension energy changes measured from SPH simulation into high-frequency density variations. Based on the compression wave propagation model, we present an approximate technique to simulate capillary wave propagation in a high-frequency particle density field. To address noise issues in wave simulation, we develop a simple way to apply the zero pressure condition on free surfaces in projection-based incompressible SPH. Our experiment shows that the developed algorithm can produce realistic capillary wave effects on both thin liquid features and large liquid bodies. Its computational overhead is also small.

Enriching SPH Simulation by Approximate Capillary Waves

Position and Orientation Based Cosserat Rods

Tassilo Kugelstadt, Elmar Schoemer

We present a novel method to simulate bending and torsion of elastic rods within the position-based dynamics (PBD) framework. The main challenge is that torsion effects of Cosserat rods are described in terms of material frames which are attached to the centerline of the rod. But frames or orientations do not fit into the classical position-based dynamics formulation. To solve this problem we introduce new types of constraints to couple orientations which are represented by unit quaternions. For constraint projection quaternions are treated in the exact same way as positions. Unit length is enforced with an additional constraint. This allows us to use the strain measures form Cosserat theory directly as constraints in PBD. It leads to very simple  algebraic expressions for the correction displacements which only contain quaternion products and additions. Our results show that our method is very robust and accurately produces the complex bending and torsion effects of rods. Due to its simplicity our method is very efficient and more than one order of magnitude faster than existing position-based rod simulation methods. It even achieves the same performance as position-based simulations without torsion effects.

Position and Orientation Based Cosserat Rods

Versatile Interactions at Interfaces for SPH-Based Simulations

Tao Yang, Ming C. Lin, Ralph R. Martin, Jian Chang, and Shi-Min Hu

The realistic capture of various interactions at interfaces is a challenging problem for SPH-based simulation. Previous works have mainly considered a single type of interaction, while real-world phenomena typically exhibit multiple interactions at different interfaces. For instance, when cracking an egg, there are simultaneous interactions between air, egg white, egg yolk, and the shell. To conveniently handle all interactions simultaneously in a single simulation, a versatile approach is critical. In this paper, we present a new approach to the surface tension model based on pairwise interaction forces; its basis is to use a larger number of neighboring particles. Our model is stable, conserves momentum, and furthermore, prevents the particle clustering problem which commonly occurs at the free surface. It can be applied to simultaneous interactions at multiple interfaces (e.g. fluid-solid and fluid-fluid). Our method is versatile, physically plausible and easy-to-implement. We also consider the close connection between droplets and bubbles, and show how to animate bubbles in air as droplets, with the help of a new surface particle detection method. Examples are provided to demonstrate the capabilities and effectiveness of our approach.

Versatile Interactions at Interfaces for SPH-Based Simulations

SCA 2016 papers