Water Wave Packets

Stefan Jeschke, Chris Wojtan

This paper presents a method for simulating water surface waves as a displacement field on a 2D domain. Our method relies on Lagrangian particles that carry packets of water wave energy; each packet carries information about an entire group of wave trains, as opposed to only a single wave crest. Our approach is unconditionally stable and can simulate high resolution geometric details. This approach also presents a straightforward interface for artistic control, because it is essentially a particle system with intuitive parameters like wavelength and amplitude. Our implementation parallelizes well and runs in real time for moderately challenging scenarios.

Water Wave Packets

A Schur Complement Preconditioner for Scalable Parallel Fluid Simulation

Jieyu Chu, Nafees Bin Zafar, Xubo Yang

We present an algorithmically efficient and parallelized domain decomposition based approach to solving Poisson’s equation on irregular domains. Our technique employs the Schur complement method, which permits a high degree of parallel efficiency on multi-core systems. We create a novel Schur complement preconditioner which achieves faster convergence, and requires less computation time and memory. This domain decomposition method allows us to apply different linear solvers for different regions of the flow. Subdomains with regular boundaries can be solved with an FFT based Fast Poisson Solver. We can solve systems with 10243 degrees of freedom, and demonstrate its use for the pressure projection step of incompressible liquid and gas simulations. The results demonstrate considerable speedup over preconditioned conjugate gradient methods commonly employed to solve such problems, including a multigrid preconditioned conjugate gradient method.

A Schur Complement Preconditioner for Scalable Parallel Fluid Simulation

Efficient Optimal Control of Smoke using Spacetime Multigrid

Zherong Pan and Dinesh Manocha

We present a novel algorithm to control the physically-based animation of smoke. Given a set of keyframe smoke shapes, we compute a dense sequence of control force fields that can drive the smoke shape to match several keyframes at certain time instances. Our approach formulates this control problem as a PDE constrained spacetime optimization and computes locally optimal control forces as the stationary point of the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. In order to reduce the high complexity of multiple passes of fluid resimulation, we utilize the coherence between consecutive fluid simulation passes and update our solution using a novel spacetime full approximation scheme (STFAS). We demonstrate the benefits of our approach by computing accurate solutions on 2D and 3D benchmarks. In practice, we observe more than an order of magnitude improvement over prior methods.

Efficient Optimal Control of Smoke using Spacetime Multigrid

Long Range Constraints for Rigid Body Simulations

Matthias Müller, Nuttapong Chentanez, Miles Macklin, Stefan Jeschke

The two main constraints used in rigid body simulations are contacts and joints. Both constrain the motion of a small number of bodies in close proximity. However, it is often the case that a series of constraints restrict the motion of objects over longer distances such as the contacts in a large pile or the joints in a chain of rigid bodies. When only short range constraints are considered, a large number of solver iterations is typically needed for long range effects to emerge because information has to be propagated through individual joints and contacts. Our basic idea to signicantly speed up this process is to analyze the contact or joint graphs and automatically derive long range constraints such as upper and lower distance bounds between bodies that can potentially be far apart both spatially and topologically. The long range constraints are either generated or updated at every time step in case of contacts or whenever their topology changes within a joint graph. The signicant increase of the convergence rate due to the use of long range constraints allows us to simulate scenarios that cannot be handled by traditional solvers with a number of solver iterations that allow real time simulation.

Long Range Constraints for Rigid Body Simulations

kDet: Parallel Constant Time Collision Detection for Polygonal Objects

René Weller, Nicole Debowski and Gabriel Zachmann

We define a novel geometric predicate and a class of objects that enables us to prove a linear bound on the number of intersecting polygon pairs for colliding 3D objects in that class. Our predicate is relevant both in theory and in practice: it is easy to check and it needs to consider only the geometric properties of the individual objects – it does not depend on the configuration of a given pair of objects. In addition, it characterizes a practically relevant class of objects: we checked our predicate on a large database of real-world 3D objects and the results show that it holds for all but the most pathological ones. Our proof is constructive in that it is the basis for a novel collision detection algorithm that realizes this linear complexity also in practice. Additionally, we present a parallelization of this algorithm with a worst-case running time that is independent of the number of polygons. Our algorithm is very well suited not only for rigid but also for deformable and even topology-changing objects, because it does not require any complex data structures or pre-processing. We have implemented our algorithm on the GPU and the results show that it is able to find in real-time all colliding polygons for pairs of deformable objects consisting of more than 200k triangles, including self-collisions.

kDet: Parallel Constant Time Collision Detection for Polygonal Objects

Geometric Stiffness for Real-time Constrained Multibody Dynamics

Sheldon Andrews, Marek Teichmann, Paul Kry

This paper focuses on the stable and efficient simulation of articulated rigid body systems for real-time applications. Specifically, we focus on the use of geometric stiffness, which can dramatically increase simulation stability. We examine several numerical problems with the inclusion of geometric stiffness in the equations of motion, as proposed by previous work, and address these issues by introducing a novel method for efficiently building the linear system. This offers improved tractability and numerical efficiency. Furthermore, geometric stiffness tends to significantly dissipate kinetic energy. We propose an adaptive damping scheme, inspired by the geometric stiffness, that uses a stability criterion based on the numerical integrator to determine the amount of non-constitutive damping required to stabilize the simulation. With this approach, not only is the dynamical behavior better preserved, but the simulation remains stable for mass ratios of 1,000,000-to-1 at time steps up to 0.1 s. We present a number of challenging scenarios to demonstrate that our method improves efficiency, and that it increases stability by orders of magnitude compared to previous work.

Geometric Stiffness for Real-time Constrained Multibody Dynamics

Fluxed Animated Boundary Method

Alexey Stomakhin, Andrew Selle

We present a novel approach to guiding physically based particle simulations using boundary conditions. Unlike commonly used ad hoc particle techniques for adding and removing the material from a simulation, our approach is principled by utilizing the concept of volumetric flux. Artists are provided with a simple yet powerful primitive called a fluxed animated boundary (FAB), allowing them to specify a control shape and a material flow field. The system takes care of enforcing the corresponding boundary conditions and necessary particle reseeding. We show how FABs can be used artistically or physically. Finally, we demonstrate production examples that show the efficacy of our method.

Fluxed Animated Boundary Method

Quasi-Newton Methods for Real-time Simulation of Hyperelastic Materials

Tiantian Liu, Sofien Bouaziz, Ladislav Kavan

We present a new method for real-time physics-based simulation supporting many different types of hyperelastic materials. Previous methods such as Position Based or Projective Dynamics are fast, but support only limited selection of materials; even classical materials such as the Neo-Hookean elasticity are not supported. Recently, Xu et al. [2015] introduced new “splinebased materials” which can be easily controlled by artists to achieve desired animation effects. Simulation of these types of materials currently relies on Newton’s method, which is slow, even with only one iteration per timestep. In this paper, we show that Projective Dynamics can be interpreted as a quasi-Newton method. This insight enables very efficient simulation of a large class of hyperelastic materials, including the Neo-Hookean, spline-based materials, and others. The quasi-Newton interpretation also allows us to leverage ideas from numerical optimization. In particular, we show that our solver can be further accelerated using L-BFGS updates (Limitedmemory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno algorithm). Our final method is typically more than 10 times faster than one iteration of Newton’s method without compromising quality. In fact, our result is often more accurate than the result obtained with one iteration of Newton’s method. Our method is also easier to implement, implying reduced software development costs.

Quasi-Newton Methods for Real-time Simulation of Hyperelastic Materials

Symposium on Computer Animation 2017

Anisotropic Elastoplasticity for Cloth, Knit and Hair Frictional Contact

Chenfanfu Jiang, Theodore Gast, Joseph Teran

The typical elastic surface or curve simulation method takes a Lagrangian approach and consists of three components: time integration, collision detection and collision response. The Lagrangian view is beneficial because it naturally allows for tracking of the codimensional manifold, however collision must then be detected and resolved separately. Eulerian methods are promising alternatives because collision processing is automatic and while this is effective for volumetric objects, advection of a codimensional manifold is too inaccurate in practice. We propose a novel hybrid Lagrangian/Eulerian approach that preserves the best aspects of both views. Similar to the Drucker-Prager and Mohr-Coulomb models for granular materials, we define our collision response with a novel elastoplastic constitutive model. To achieve this, we design an anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model that separately characterizes the response to manifold strain as well as shearing and compression in the directions orthogonal to the manifold. We discretize the model with the Material Point Method and a novel codimensional Lagrangian/Eulerian update of the deformation gradient. Collision intensive scenarios with millions of degrees of freedom require only a few minutes per frame and examples with up to one million degrees of freedom run in less than thirty seconds per frame.

Anisotropic Elastoplasticity for Cloth, Knit and Hair Frictional Contact