Reconstructing Personalized Anatomical Models for Physics-based Body Animation

Petr Kadlecek, Alexandru-Eugen Ichim, Tiantian Liu, Ladislav Kavan, Jaroslav Krivanek

We present a method to create personalized anatomical models ready for physics-based animation, using only on a set of surface 3D scans. We start by building a template anatomical model of an average male which supports deformations due to both 1) subject-specific variations: shapes and sizes of bones, muscles, and adipose tissues and 2) skeletal poses. Next, we capture a set of 3D scans of an actor in various poses. Our key contribution is formulating and solving a large-scale optimization problem where we solve for both subject-specific and pose-dependent parameters such that our resulting anatomical model explains the captured 3D scans as closely as possible. Compared to data-driven body modeling techniques that focus only on the surface, our approach has the advantage of creating physics-based models, which provide realistic 3D geometry of the bones and muscles, and naturally supports effects such as inertia, gravity, and collisions according to the Newtonian dynamics.

Reconstructing Personalized Anatomical Models for Physics-based Body Animation

SMASH: Physics-guided Reconstruction of Collisions from Videos

Aron Monszpart, Nils Thuerey, Niloy J. Mitra

Collision sequences are commonly used in games and entertainment to add drama and excitement. Authoring even two body collisions in the real world can be difficult, as one has to get timing and the object trajectories to be correctly synchronized. After tedious trial-and-error iterations, when objects can actually be made to collide, then they are difficult to capture in 3D. In contrast, synthetically generating plausible collisions is difficult as it requires adjusting different collision parameters (e.g., object mass ratio, coefficient of restitution, etc.) and appropriate initial parameters. We present SMASH to directly read off appropriate collision parameters directly from raw input video recordings. Technically we enable this by utilizing laws of rigid body collision to regularize the problem of lifting 2D trajectories to a physically valid 3D reconstruction of the collision. The reconstructed sequences can then be modified and combined to easily author novel and plausible collisions. We evaluate our system on a range of synthetic scenes and demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by accurately reconstructing several complex real world collision events.

SMASH: Physics-guided Reconstruction of Collisions from Videos

Eulerian Solid-Fluid Coupling

Yun Teng, David I.W. Levin, Theodore Kim

We present a new method that achieves a two-way coupling between deformable solids and an incompressible fluid where the underlying geometric representation is entirely Eulerian. Using the recently developed Eulerian Solids approach [Levin et al. 2011], we are able to simulate multiple solids undergoing complex, frictional contact while simultaneously interacting with a fluid. The complexity of the scenarios we are able to simulate surpasses those that we have seen from any previous method. Eulerian Solids have previously been integrated using explicit schemes, but we develop an implicit scheme that allows large time steps to be taken. The incompressibility condition is satisfied in both the solid and the fluid, which has the added benefit of simplifying collision handling.

Eulerian Solid-Fluid Coupling

A scalable Schur-complement fluids solver for heterogeneous compute platforms

Haixiang Liu, Nathan Mitchell, Mridul Aanjaneya, Eftychios Sifakis

We present a scalable parallel solver for the pressure Poisson equation in fluids simulation which can accommodate complex irregular domains in the order of a billion degrees of freedom, using a single server or workstation fitted with GPU or Many-Core accelerators. The design of our numerical technique is attuned to the subtleties of heterogeneous computing, and allows us to benefit from the high memory and compute bandwidth of GPU accelerators even for problems that are too large to fit entirely on GPU memory. This is achieved via algebraic formulations that adequately increase the density of the GPU-hosted computation as to hide the overhead of offloading from the CPU, in exchange for accelerated convergence. Our solver follows the principles of Domain Decomposition techniques, and is based on the Schur complement method for elliptic partial differential equations. A large uniform grid is partitioned in non-overlapping subdomains, and bandwidth-optimized (GPU or Many-Core) accelerator cards are used to efficiently and concurrently solve independent Poisson problems on each resulting subdomain. Our novel contributions are centered on the careful steps necessary to assemble an accurate global solver from these constituent blocks, while avoiding excessive communication or dense linear algebra. We ultimately produce a highly effective Conjugate Gradients preconditioner, and demonstrate scalable and accurate performance on high-resolution simulations of water and smoke flow.

A scalable Schur-complement fluids solver for heterogeneous compute platforms

Vivace: a Practical Gauss-Seidel Method for Stable Soft Body Dynamics

Marco Fratarcangeli, Valentina Tibaldo, Fabio Pellacini

The solution of large sparse systems of linear constraints is at the base of most interactive solvers for physically-based animation of soft body dynamics. We focus on applications with hard and tight per-frame resource budgets, such as video games, where the solution of soft body dynamics needs to be computed in a few milliseconds. Linear iterative methods are preferred in these cases since they provide approximate solutions within a given error tolerance and in a short amount of time. We present a parallel randomized Gauss-Seidel method which can be effectively employed to enable the animation of 3D soft objects discretized as large and irregular triangular or tetrahedral meshes. At the beginning of each frame, we partition the set of equations governing the system using a randomized graph coloring algorithm. The unknowns in the equations belonging to the same partition are independent of each other. Then, all the equations belonging to the same partition are solved at the same time in parallel. Our algorithm runs completely on the GPU and can support changes in the constraints topology. We tested our method as a solver for soft body dynamics within the Projective Dynamics and Position Based Dynamics frameworks. We show how the algorithmic simplicity of this iterative strategy enables great numerical stability and fast convergence speed, which are essential features for physically based animations with fixed and small hard time budgets. Compared to the state of the art, we found our method to be faster and scale better while providing stabler solutions for very small time budgets.

Vivace: a Practical Gauss-Seidel Method for Stable Soft Body Dynamics

Descent Methods for Elastic Body Simulation on the GPU

Huamin Wang, Yin Yang

We show that many existing elastic body simulation approaches can be interpreted as descent methods, under a nonlinear optimization framework derived from implicit time integration. The key question is how to find an effective descent direction with a low computational cost. Based on this concept, we propose a new gradient descent method using Jacobi preconditioning and Chebyshev acceleration. The convergence rate of this method is comparable to that of LBFGS or nonlinear conjugate gradient. But unlike other methods, it requires no dot product operation, making it suitable for GPU implementation. To further improve its convergence and performance, we develop a series of step length adjustment, initialization, and invertible model conversion techniques, all of which are compatible with GPU acceleration. Our experiment shows that the resulting simulator is simple, fast, scalable, memory-efficient, and robust against very large time steps and deformations. It can correctly simulate the deformation behaviors of many elastic materials, as long as their energy functions are second-order differentiable and their Hessian matrices can be quickly evaluated. For additional speedups, the method can also serve as a complement to other techniques, such as multi-grid.

Descent Methods for Elastic Body Simulation on the GPU

High-Resolution Interaction with Corotational Coarsening Models

Rosell Torres, Alejandro Rodríguez, José Miguel Espadero, Miguel A. Otaduy

This paper presents a numerical coarsening method for corotational elasticity, which enables interactive large deformation of high-resolution heterogeneous objects. Our method derives a coarse elastic model from a high-resolution discretization of corotational elasticity with high-resolution boundary conditions. This is in contrast to previous coarsening methods, which derive a coarse elastic model from an unconstrained high-resolution discretization of regular linear elasticity, and then apply corotational computations directly on the coarse setting. We show that previous approaches fail to handle high-resolution boundary conditions correctly, suffering accuracy and robustness problems. Our method, on the other hand, supports efficiently accurate high-resolution boundary conditions, which are fundamental for rich interaction with high-resolution heterogeneous models. We demonstrate the potential of our method for interactive deformation of complex medical imaging data sets.

High-Resolution Interaction with Corotational Coarsening Models

Dispersion Kernels for Water Wave Simulation

José A. Canabal, David Miraut, Nils Thürey, Theodore Kim, Javier Portilla, Miguel A. Otaduy

We propose a method to simulate the rich, scale-dependent dynamics of water waves. Our method preserves the dispersion properties of real waves, yet it supports interactions with obstacles and is computationally efficient. Fundamentally, it computes wave accelerations by way of applying a dispersion kernel as a spatially variant filter, which we are able to compute efficiently using two core technical contributions. First, we design novel, accurate, and compact pyramid kernels which compensate for low-frequency truncation errors. Second, we design a shadowed convolution operation that efficiently accounts for obstacle interactions by modulating the application of the dispersion kernel. We demonstrate a wide range of behaviors, which include capillary waves, gravity waves, and interactions with static and dynamic obstacles, all from within a single simulation.

Dispersion Kernels for Water Wave Simulation

Enriching Triangle Mesh Animations with Physically Based Simulation

Yijing Li, Hongyi Xu, Jernej Barbič

We present a system to combine arbitrary triangle mesh animations with physically based Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation, enabling control over the combination both in space and time. The input is a triangle mesh animation obtained using any method, such as keyframed animation, character rigging, 3D scanning, or geometric shape modeling. The input may be non-physical, crude or even incomplete. The user provides weights, specified using a minimal user interface, for how much physically based simulation should be allowed to modify the animation in any region of the model, and in time. Our system then computes a physically-based animation that is constrained to the input animation to the amount prescribed by these weights. This permits smoothly turning physics on and off over space and time, making it possible for the output to strictly follow the input, to evolve purely based on physically based simulation, and anything in between. Achieving such results requires a careful combination of several system components. We propose and analyze these components, including proper automatic creation of simulation meshes (even for non-manifold and self-colliding undeformed triangle meshes), converting triangle mesh animations into animations of the simulation mesh, and resolving collisions and self-collisions while following the input.

Enriching Triangle Mesh Animations with Physically Based Simulation

An Efficient Hybrid Incompressible SPH Solver with Interface Handling for Boundary Conditions

Tetsuya Takahashi, Yoshinori Dobashi, Tomoyuki Nishita, Ming Lin

We propose a hybrid Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics solver for efficiently simulating incompressible fluids using an interface handling method for boundary conditions in the pressure Poisson equation. We blend particle density computed with one smooth and one spiky kernel to improve the robustness against both fluid-fluid and fluid-solid collisions. To further improve the robustness and efficiency, we present a new interface handling method consisting of two components: free surface handling for Dirichlet boundary conditions and solid boundary handling for Neumann boundary conditions. Our free surface handling appropriately determines particles for Dirichlet boundary conditions using Jacobi-based pressure prediction while our solid boundary handling introduces a new term to ensure the solvability of the linear system. We demonstrate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art particle-based fluid solvers.

An Efficient Hybrid Incompressible SPH Solver with Interface Handling for Boundary Conditions